RAISE YOUR VOICE AND BE HEARD!

Tulane’s School of Liberal Arts Young Public Scholars Program is designed to inspire students to create a public impact on the topic learned about during their week of enrichment. The topics varies from Climate Change, Social Inequalities, Inclusive Diversity, and Restorative Justice. Working with a professor and their peers, each student is challenged to hone their unique voice based on evidence obtained from their research and analysis. Afternoon workshops give students a media tool kit to enable students to communicate learning creatively and effectively through writing, photography, video and audio clips. Each student will strive to reach over 3000 weekly readers of ViaNolaVie.org, New Orleans’ online culture magazine founded by local professional journalists. At the end of the creative public scholar experience, each student will have a digital portfolio to include in their résumés.

Tulane’s Young Public Scholars Program is a selective pre-college program centered around students’ knowledge of complex global problems and their skills to affect change. Students entering their sophomore, junior, or senior year of high school will get a preview of the college classroom while diving deep into a pressing issue of our time, its historical roots and the most current frameworks for researching it.

Program Highlights

Courses feature seminar discussions and collaborative projects. Students in different courses come together for select workshops, lunch breaks, and a closing reception for families.

All Public Scholars courses work together to deepen students’ understanding of complex global problems.

Students connect with the city of New Orleans through hands-on projects and engagements with the local community.

Instructors are all university faculty with professional media-making experience.

School of Liberal Arts Summer Session offers 4 different week-long courses in either a two-week residential option or a one-week day option for students who live in the greater New Orleans area. Students may take any course or pair of courses.

Courses

Tulane's Young Public Scholars Program offers 4 different week-long courses in either a two-week residential option or a one-week day option for students who live in the greater New Orleans area. Students may take any course or pair of courses.

Each week-long course features full days of seminar discussions and collaborative projects. Students in different courses come together for select workshops, lunch breaks, and a closing reception for families.

Session 3A, July 6-10

Popular Music as Social Critique

With Dr. Christine Capetola

Music is a lens for thinking about gender, race, and sexuality in the context of a spectacle. Readings will include Beyoncé in Formation by Omise'eke Tinsley and music reviews. Students will experience live music in the city and write their own music review to publish on ViaNolaVie.

Christine Capetola (Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin) has been a professional freelancer and music critic on the intersections of music and identity for Bitch Magazine. With degrees in American Studies and Performance Studies, she puts female artists in focus. She’s a fan of Lana del Rey and Janet Jackson.

Session 3B, July 13-17

Punishment and Redemption from the Industrial Prison Complex

With Betsy Weiss

Louisiana leads the world historically in incarceration rates and now in criminal justice reform. Learn about the broad social impacts of a justice system rooted in inequalities and the struggles to reverse them. Students meet with formerly incarcerated activists while studying the structures for incarceration through film, video, and reportage. Students will learn interview techniques in producing a profile for ViaNolaVie.

Betsy Weiss (M.F.A., San Francisco State University; M.S.W. Hunter College) trained as an experimental filmmaker and a social worker before blending these in social justice documentary. Using collaborative oral histories as method, she has worked with activists and artists to create social change through media.

Session 4A, July 20-24

Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene

With Dr. Ned Randolph

The layers of history are written in the geographies of New Orleans and its surroundings. Understand how slavery is embedded in the scenery of public spaces and the construction of zones of exclusion. Students will visit significant landscapes for environmental struggles. Readings include John McPhee, Rachel Carson, and other environmental essayists. Students will learn first-person non-fiction techniques to write an op-ed to publish on ViaNolaVie.

Ned Randolph (Ph.D., University of California, San Diego) worked as a reporter covering the region for The Advocate newspaper, before leaving the newspaper business to study environmental infrastructures and the geography of the Mississippi. Recently he has been investigating the roots of the area known as Cancer Alley.

Session 4B, July 27-31

Promoting the Arts Against Censorship

With Kelley Crawford

The arts have a long history as a bulwark against social injustice and a bullhorn for alternative futures. Exploring the arts as a means to communicate identity and politics, students explore short readings by Ta-Nehisi Coates, Ursula Le Guin and Simone de Beauvoir. Students visit a radio station in preparation to produce their short audio pieces for ViaNolaVie.

Kelley Crawford (M.F.A. candidate, University of New Orleans) is co-founder and Editor of ViaNolaVie, a professor at Tulane and Bard Early College, and a radio journalist and host on WWNO, the local NPR affiliate. Her profiles with local artists and entrepreneurs are a weekly staple in local media outlets. In her free time, you may spy her as a participant in inventive public art performances.

Founded in 1834, Tulane University has the academic traditions and background in the scientific fields, humanities, and the arts to ensure the excellence of its programs. Dedicated staff and faculty, ties to the local community, and hands-on learning come together to provide a transformative educational experience for Pre-College students.

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